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CTMUA / TMUA Proof and Logic (Paper 2) Course (In-Person)

£229.00

☚ Click here to go back to all currently-available Cambridge CTMUA courses.

☚ Click here to go back to all currently-available TMUA courses.

Date: Sunday October 13th 2019

Location: Marylebone – London*

Times: 10am – 4:30pm

Pricing:

  • £199 before 3rd October, then:
  • £229 thereafter

You will learn to:

  • Confidently check if a condition is necessary or sufficient
  • Use straightforward rules to analyse statements with multiple quantifiers, negations, and conditionals
  • Immediately spot the sources of common flaws in proofs, such as additional or missed solutions
  • Deal with counterexamples, consequences, and assumptions, even in completely unfamiliar contexts
  • Avoid common pitfalls, like functions on limited domains, or manipulations that only work if a quantity is positive

See bottom of page for more information about the course and what it contains.

*Full details available upon registration

Description

A 1-day STEPMaths Preparation Course for students sitting CTMUA / TMUA or similar exams for entry to Cambridge, Durham, Warwick, LSE, or another university. Takes place in October.

Following up our popular course on the rapid-fire short maths questions found in both TMUA papers, we present a similar course targeted at the unique proof- and logic-based questions in paper 2 of the TMUA.

We know at this point in your preparation, you will probably have tackled the majority of the past papers, so this course will cover original questions that we have made up. The style of question found in paper 2 is unlike anything you will see at A-level and will require practice at logical reasoning, manipulating quantifiers, negations, and conditionals, and analysing proofs. These are also skills that are vital for a degree in Computer Science or Maths, so you may well be tested on them if you are invited to interview too.

Working with partners, you will learn by practice how to:

  • Confidently check if a condition is necessary or sufficient
  • Use straightforward rules to analyse statements with multiple quantifiers, negations, and conditionals
  • Immediately spot the sources of common flaws in proofs, such as additional or missed solutions
  • Deal with counterexamples, consequences, and assumptions, even in completely unfamiliar contexts
  • Avoid common pitfalls, like functions on limited domains, or manipulations that only work if a quantity is positive

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