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In your first year studying Maths and Computer Science at Oxford, you cover a broad range of both Maths and Computer Science modules. 

The appeal of Maths and Computer Science, like many joint degrees, is the sheer breadth of modules you can cover. What’s more, Maths and Computer Science modules often complement each other – algorithms and the mathematics of sets build on each other.

Maths Modules

Details of each module can be found in our post covering maths at Oxbridge.

  • Introduction to university mathematics (learning about methods of proofs, terminology, and using sets and correct mathematical notation.) 
  • Introduction to complex numbers (a short course exploring complex numbers and ensuring everyone has the same level of basic skills.) 
  • Linear Algebra 
  • Analysis (this covers sequences and series, continuity and differentiation and integration.) 
  • Probability
  • Groups and group actions

Computer Science Modules

Details of each module can be found in our post covering Computer Science at Oxbridge.

  • Functional programming
  • Imperative programming
  • Design and analysis of algorithms

How will I be examined?

At the end of your first year, you have five written examinations covering this content. You also have about five projects over the year that you have to pass these. Projects take one day a week for two hours, and are three weeks long in duration (so six hours per project.) Although you get the option to do these in computer labs, you can do them independently if you would rather, and spend time on them outside of the labs, and then just get them signed off. 

The labs diversify the degree, giving you a wide range of learning and assessment opportunities. Although the first year focuses heavily on maths, as the degree progresses you can introduce a greater weight towards computer science modules, and you also get a wide option of maths modules, including some applied options. 

Conclusion

Maths and Computer Science is an exciting and rewarding degree that you should consider if you love both maths and programming. If you’re interested, take a look at our guide to the application process, or for some inspiration, see our example personal statement.

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